Research Themes

Archived Datasets

Most of PRBA’s data collections are archived and available to the public through ICPSR.

The Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)
Institute for Social Research
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-1248
(734) 764-3570

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), is an international organization of more than 750 academic institutions and research organizations, and provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for the social science research community. ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 250,000 files of research in the social and behavioral sciences. It has a nearly 50-year track record for preserving and making data available over several generational shifts in technology.

Not all data from PRBA studies have been archived with the ICPSR. Listed under each category are some of the recent studies that have been archived.

National Survey of American Life Series

Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), 2001-2003 [United States] (ICPSR 20240)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/20240

Version Date: March 23, 2016

Principal Investigator(s):
Margarita Alegria, Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research at Cambridge Health Alliance; James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research; Ronald C. Kessler, Harvard Medical School. Department of Health Care Policy; David Takeuchi, University of Washington

Summary:
The Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES) were initiated in recognition of the need for contemporary, comprehensive epidemiological data regarding the distributions, correlates and risk factors of mental disorders among the general population with special emphasis on minority groups. The primary objective of the CPES was to collect data about the prevalence of mental disorders, impairments associated with these disorders, and their treatment patterns from representative samples of majority and minority adult populations in the United States. Secondary goals were to obtain information about language use and ethnic disparities, support systems, discrimination and assimilation, in order to examine whether and how closely various mental health disorders are linked to social and cultural issues. To this end, CPES joins together three nationally representative surveys: the NATIONAL COMORBIDITY SURVEY REPLICATION (NCS-R), the NATIONAL SURVEY OF AMERICAN LIFE (NSAL), and the NATIONAL LATINO AND ASIAN AMERICAN STUDY (NLAAS). These surveys collectively provide the first national data with sufficient power to investigate cultural and ethnic influences on mental disorders. In this manner, CPES permits analysts to approach analysis of the combined dataset as though it were a single, nationally representative survey. Each of the CPES surveys has been documented in a comprehensive and flexible manner that promotes cross-survey linking of key data and scientific constructs.

National Survey of American Life Self-Administered Questionnaire (NSAL-SAQ), February 2001-June 2003 (ICPSR 27121)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/27121

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research; Cleopatra H. Caldwell, University of Michigan. Research Center for Group Dynamics; David R. Williams, University of Michigan. Survey Research Center; Harold W. Neighbors, University of Michigan, Research Center for Group Dynamics; Randolph M. Nesse, University of Michigan. Research Center for Group Dynamics; Robert Joseph Taylor, University of Michigan. Research Center for Group Dynamics; Steven J. Trierweiler, University of Michigan. Research Center for Group Dynamics

Summary:
The National Survey of American Life, 2001-2003 (NSAL) was followed up by a self-administered interview (NSAL SAQ) as a way to reduce respondent burden following the 2 ½- hour NSAL survey. The SAQ includes additional questions about social, group, and individual characteristics: psychological resources (i.e., John Henryism), group and personal identity (racial awareness and identity), as well as ideology and racial relations (i.e., social dominance; stratification beliefs; egalitarianism; national pride; work ethic; authoritarian, interracial contact; and exposure to Black social contexts); political attitudes (i.e., Race-conscious Policy Index, Race-blind Policy Index, Non-Electoral Participation Index); care of elderly values; job and financial stressors; and wealth. Demographic variables include age, race, and sex.

National Survey of American Life – Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), 2001-2004 (ICPSR 36380)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/36380

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research; Cleopatra H. Caldwell, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Research Center for Group Dynamics; Toni C. Antonucci, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center; Daphna R. Oyserman, University of Southern California. Department of Psychology

Summary:
The National Survey of American Life Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), 2001-2004, was designed to estimate the lifetime-to-date and current prevalence, age-of-onset distributions, course, and comorbidity of DSM-IV disorders among African American and Caribbean adolescents in the United States; to identify risk and protective factors for the onset and persistence of these disorders; to describe patterns and correlates of service use for these disorders; and to lay the groundwork for subsequent follow-up studies that can be used to identify early expressions of adult mental disorders. In addition and similar to the NSAL adult dataset (Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), 2001-2003 [United States] (ICPSR 20240)), the adolescent dataset contains detailed measures of health; social conditions; stressors; distress; racial identity; subjective, neighborhood conditions; activities and school; media; and social and psychological protective and risk factors. Numerous variables from the adult dataset have been merged into the adolescent dataset, as the NSAL adult and adolescent respondents reside in the same households. Some of these variables apply to the entire household (i.e. region, urbanicity, and family income), while others apply specifically to the NSAL adult respondent living in the adolescent’s household (i.e. adult years of education, adult marital status, and adult nativity [foreign-born vs. US born]). The immigration measures were asked of Caribbean black adult respondents only. No comparable measures assess the immigration and generational status of the Caribbean black adolescent respondents. The adult dataset measures are merged into the adolescent dataset to assist in approximating these measures for adolescent respondents. The NSAL adolescent dataset also includes variables for other non-core and experimental disorders. These include tobacco use/nicotine dependence, premenstrual syndrome, minor depression, recurrent brief depression, hypomania, and hypomania sub-threshold. Demographic variables include age, race and ethnicity, ancestry or national origins, height, weight, marital status, income, and education level.

National Politics Study Series

National Politics Study, 2008 (ICPSR 36167)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/36167

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research; Vincent L. Hutchings, University of Michigan. Institute of Social Research; Cara Wong, University of Michigan. Institute of Social Research; Ronald Brown, Wayne State University

Summary:
The 2008 election offers a rare opportunity to analyze a significant event in American history – the election of the first African American president. Because the longitudinal panel series began in 2004, prior to the emergence of President Obama as a serious political candidate and nominee, the results from these surveys provide a rare vehicle for comparing data over time on important demographic, political, and, of particular interest given President Obama’s racial background, racial and ethnic issues related to vote choice and political behavior. The wealth of data obtained from this survey will benefit scholars for many years to come.
This report provides a general overview of some of the key findings from the 2008 data collection. Topics covered include: demographic information of the population, work status, home ownership, political ideology, party identification, presidential choice, race relations, feeling thermometer data for a variety of political figures and relevant groups or organizations, and current events such as the Iraq War and same-sex marriage. Because differences among the racial and ethnic groups surveyed in this study are of political significance (Whites, African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and Caribbean Blacks), much of the data presented here is disaggregated by racial and ethnic group.

National Politics Study, 2004 (ICPSR 24483)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/24483

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan; Vincent L. Hutchings, University of Michigan; Ronald Brown, Wayne State University; Cara Wong, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Summary:
This dataset was created by merging information collected from three questionnaires that form part of the NATIONAL SURVEY OF BLACK AMERICANS, 1979-1980 (ICPSR 8512) (NSBA). The three questionnaires were (1) the original cross-sectional survey questionnaire, (2) the re-interview questionnaire, and (3) the family members questionnaire. All three were administered from 1979-1981. The unit of analysis in this dataset is three generations of a family, or a “triad.” Each unit or record has identical variables for the three individuals making up a triad (i.e., a grandparent, parent, and child). There are 510 triads in this dataset. The study explores feelings and attitudes across the three generations regarding neighborhood-community integration, services, crime and community contact, the role of religion and the church, physical and mental health, and self-esteem. Employment, the effects of chronic unemployment, the effects of race on the job, and interaction with family and friends are also examined. In addition, the survey provides information on racial attitudes, race identity, group stereotypes, and race ideology. Demographic variables include age, education, income, occupation, and political behavior and affiliation.

National Black Election Study, 1996 (ICPSR 2029)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/2029

Principal Investigator(s):
Katherine Tate, University of California, Irvine

Summary:
This data collection provides information on the attitudes and political preferences of the Black electorate during the 1996 presidential election, and contains both pre- and post-election components. A total of 1,216 respondents completed interviews during the pre-election component, 854 of whom were reinterviewed for the post-election component. Questions regarding party identification, political interest, and preferences and choices for president were asked. In addition, respondents were matched to their congressional districts and asked to evaluate their House representatives. Also included were questions regarding social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of candidates and groups, opinions on questions of public policy, participation in political life, race and gender issues, economic matters, quality of life, government spending, and religion and church politics. Demographic information on respondents includes sex, age, education, marital status, income, and occupation and industry.

National Black Politics Study, [United States], 1993 (ICPSR 2018)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/2018/summary

Principal Investigator(s):
Michael C. Dawson, University of Chicago; Ronald (Ronald E. L.) Brown, Wayne State University; James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan

Summary:
The National Black Politics Study was designed to provide information on attitudes and opinions regarding a number of issues of importance to Black Americans. Topics included the performance of President Bill Clinton, the economic condition of Black Americans, and what respondents thought ought to be done to improve the condition of Black people. Questions regarding Black women and their role in the Black community were also asked. In addition, the role and extent of religion in Black politics was investigated. Respondents also provided information about their political self-identification and their community and political involvement, as well as their feelings toward various political leaders, political groups, and national policies. Demographic information on respondents includes sex, age, education, marital status, income, and occupation and industry.

National Black Election Panel Study, 1984 and 1988 (ICPSR 9954)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/9954

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Research Center for Group Dynamics

Summary:
This survey focuses on the attitudes and political preferences of the Black electorate during the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections. Questions regarding party identification, political interest, and preferences and choices for president were asked. In addition, respondents were asked about their feelings concerning Jesse Jackson’s campaigns for the presidency in 1984 and 1988 and the effect his campaigns had on the elections. Information on race and gender issues, economic matters, quality of life, government spending, political participation, and religion and church politics is also included. Demographic information on respondents includes sex, age, education, marital status, income, and occupation and industry.

National Black Election Study, 1984 (ICPSR 8938)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/8938

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan; Patricia Gurin, University of Michigan; Shirley Hatchett, University of Michigan

Summary:
This survey deals with the attitudes and political preferences of the Black electorate during the 1984 presidential election and contains information on both pre-election and post-election respondents. Questions regarding party identification, political interest, and preferences and choices for president were asked. In addition, respondents were asked about their feelings concerning Jesse Jackson’s campaign for the presidency and the effect his campaign had on the election. Information on race and gender issues, economic matters, quality of life, government spending, political participation, and religion and church politics is also included.

National Survey of Black Americans Series

National Survey of Black Americans, Waves 1-4, 1979-1980, 1987-1988, 1988-1989, 1992

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center; Harold W. Neighbors, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center

Summary:
The purpose of this data collection was to provide an appropriate theoretical and empirical approach to concepts, measures, and methods in the study of Black Americans. Developed with input from social scientists, students, and a national advisory panel of Black scholars, the survey investigates neighborhood-community integration, services, crime and community contact, the role of religion and the church, physical and mental health, self-esteem, life satisfaction, employment, the effects of chronic unemployment, the effects of race on the job, interaction with family and friends, racial attitudes, race identity, group stereotypes, and race ideology. Demographic variables include education, marital status, income, employment status, occupation, and political behavior and affiliation.

Three-Generation National Survey of Black American Families, 1979-1981

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/9288

Principal Investigator(s):
James S. (James Sidney) Jackson, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center; M. Belinda Tucker, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center

Summary:
This dataset was created by merging information collected from three questionnaires that form part of the NATIONAL SURVEY OF BLACK AMERICANS, 1979-1980 (ICPSR 8512) (NSBA). The three questionnaires were (1) the original cross-sectional survey questionnaire, (2) the reinterview questionnaire, and (3) the family members questionnaire. All three were administered from 1979-1981. The unit of analysis in this dataset is three generations of a family, or a “triad.” Each unit or record has identical variables for the three individuals making up a triad (i.e., a grandparent, parent, and child). There are 510 triads in this dataset. The study explores feelings and attitudes across the three generations regarding neighborhood-community integration, services, crime and community contact, the role of religion and the church, physical and mental health, and self-esteem. Employment, the effects of chronic unemployment, the effects of race on the job, and interaction with family and friends are also examined. In addition, the survey provides information on racial attitudes, race identity, group stereotypes, and race ideology. Demographic variables include age, education, income, occupation, and political behavior and affiliation.